Federal US Government using DEA to Hire Drivers for Transportation and Hire Growers for Cultivation of Cannabis Marijuana Products

2017 Current

#1 .Gov Source >

#2 .Gov Source >

 

Entitled: 

Secured Transportation of Hazardous Waste

Solicitation Number: DJD-17-R-0016

Agency: Department of Justice
Office: Drug Enforcement Administration
Location: Office of Acquisition Management

  • Original Synopsis
  • Feb 13, 2017
  • 11:41 am

Synopsis:

Added: Feb 13, 2017 11:41 am

The DEA intends to issue a solicitation for Secured Transport Services of Bulk Marijuana and Other Hazardous Waste Materials. The requirement will be for multiple locations in Houston and El Paso, Texas, as well as Phoenix, Arizona. The proposed contract period performance is a base year and four (4) twelve-month option periods. The anticipated solicitation date release is on or about February 28, 2017. A previous posting of this requirement (including a draft Statement of Work) can be found under "D-16-HO-0197."

Contracting Office Address:

None
Washington, District of Columbia 20537

Place of Performance:

8701 Morrissette Drive
Springfield, Virginia 22152
United States

Primary Point of Contact.:

Frank C. Giguere

Frank.C.Giguere@usdoj.gov

Phone: 2023077987

  Classification Code:

V -- Transportation, travel, & relocation services

NAICS Code:

484 -- Truck Transportation/484121 -- General Freight Trucking, Long-Distance, Truckload   

SOURCED FROM https://www.fbo.gov/

The federal government is seeking to hire teams of professionals to transport "Bulk Marijuana and Other Hazardous Waste Materials," according to a solicitation notice posted this week.

The 100% legal action work will mostly take place in Houston, El Paso and Phoenix, where the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) says agents seize "enormous amounts of marijuana each year" largely as a result of referrals from the U.S. Border Patrol. 

Another Source claims Fed is hiring growers for cultivation:

   Saying you grow marijuana "for research" sounds like an excuse an 18-year-old college student would give to campus security. But the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is looking for candidates to do just that.

The agency is reportedly recruiting people to grow marijuana for federally sanctioned research in the US.

In August, the DEA sent waves of hope through the medical marijuana community when it announced it would finally allow new institutions to obtain grow licenses. There's just one problem: The DEA has no takers.

Health news site STAT contacted almost a dozen agriculture schools last month and found that not one was interested or planned to apply for registration with the DEA.

STAT put in calls to universities from coast to coast, including schools in pot-friendly states, such as the University of California – Davis, Colorado State University, and Oregon State University, which offers a sociology class on "marijuana policy in the 21st century."

Other schools that were contacted include Cornell University, Virginia Tech, University of Vermont, Michigan State University, and Purdue University. 

   Saying you grow marijuana "for research" sounds like an excuse an 18-year-old college student would give to campus security. But the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is looking for candidates to do just that.

The agency is reportedly recruiting people to grow marijuana for federally sanctioned research in the US.

In August, the DEA sent waves of hope through the medical marijuana community when it announced it would finally allow new institutions to obtain grow licenses. There's just one problem: The DEA has no takers.

Health news site STAT contacted almost a dozen agriculture schools last month and found that not one was interested or planned to apply for registration with the DEA.

STAT put in calls to universities from coast to coast, including schools in pot-friendly states, such as the University of California – Davis, Colorado State University, and Oregon State University, which offers a sociology class on "marijuana policy in the 21st century."

Other schools that were contacted include Cornell University, Virginia Tech, University of Vermont, Michigan State University, and Purdue University. 

STAT's Andrew Joseph learned from speaking with researchers that many are wary of the costs associated with opening a cultivation facility. Construction alone could set growers back millions of dollars, according to an attorney who formerly coordinated Illinois' medical marijuana program.

Growers must also show evidence they have security measures in place to keep the marijuana safe from prying hands, which adds to the expenditures.

The DEA has also implied it's not looking for candidates with "previous experience handling controlled substances," regardless of marijuana's legal status in the state where they reside. The disclaimer is enough to scare away applicants who have dabbled in cultivating pot.

Until now, the University of Mississippi has cornered the market on marijuana manufacturing.

Over four decades ago, the DEA teamed up with the University of Mississippi to grow weed legally and distribute it for federally authorized studies. Because of this monopoly, scientists had to wait years to get their hands on research-grade drugs that meet their specifications. Allowing more universities to grow means there will be more strains available for study.

The DEA's move to open its application process clears a major hurdle for researchers wanting to build evidence in support of the plant's medicinal use. Now the agency just needs volunteers.

Applications To Become Registered Under the Controlled Substances Act To Manufacture Marijuana To Supply Researchers in the United States

AGENCY:

Drug Enforcement Administration, Department of Justice.

ACTION:

Policy statement.

SUMMARY:

To facilitate research involving marijuana and its chemical constituents, DEA is adopting a new policy that is designed to increase the number of entities registered under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) to grow (manufacture) marijuana to supply legitimate researchers in the United States. This policy statement explains how DEA will evaluate applications for such registration consistent with the CSA and the obligations of the United States under the applicable international drug control treaty.

DATES:

August 12, 2016.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

Michael J. Lewis, Office of Diversion Control, Drug Enforcement Administration; Mailing Address: 8701 Morrissette Drive, Springfield, Virginia 22152; Telephone: (202) 598-6812.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background

Reasons for This Policy Statement

There is growing public interest in exploring the possibility that marijuana or its chemical constituents may be used as potential treatments for certain medical conditions. The Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act requires that before a new drug is allowed to enter the U.S. market, it must be demonstrated through adequate and well-controlled clinical trials to be both safe and effective for its intended uses. Congress long ago established this process, recognizing that it was essential to protect the health and welfare of the American people.

Although no drug product made from marijuana has yet been shown to be safe and effective in such clinical trials, DEA—along with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH)—fully supports expanding research into the potential medical utility of marijuana and its chemical constituents.[1]

There are a variety of factors that influence whether and to what extent such research takes place. Some of the key factors—such as funding—are beyond DEA's control.[2] However, one of the ways DEA can help to facilitate research involving marijuana is to take steps, within the framework of the CSA and U.S. treaty obligations, to increase the lawful supply of marijuana available to researchers.

For nearly 50 years, the United States has relied on a single grower to produce marijuana used in research. This grower operates under a contract with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). This longstanding arrangement has historically been considered by the U.S. Government to be the best way to satisfy our nation's obligations under the applicable international drug control treaty, as discussed in more detail below. For most of the nearly 50 years that this single marijuana grower arrangement has been in existence, the demand for research-grade marijuana in the United States was relatively limited—and the single grower was able to meet such limited demand. However, in recent years, there has been greater public interest in expanding marijuana-related research, particularly with regard to certain chemical constituents in the plant known as cannabinoids.

Sourced From: https://www.federalregister.gov/

Ending Image: